Category Archives: Collaborations

FINAL CALL FOR PAPERS 5th Annual Entrepreneurship as Practice Conference and PhD Symposium 2020

PhD Symposium: March 30 – April 3 2020

Conference: March 31 – April 2 2020

Host: Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Organizing team: Karen Verduijn (VU Amsterdam), Neil Thompson (VU Amsterdam), Orla Byrne (UC Dublin), Bill Gartner (Babson College), Bruce Teague (Eastern Washington), Inge Hill (Coventry), Thomas Cyron (Jönköping University)

Confirmed keynote speaker: Chris Steyaert (University of St. Gallen)

 

Important Dates:

December 16, 2019                       Abstract Submission Deadline                           

December 20, 2019                       Notification of Acceptance

February 16, 2020                         Full Paper Submission Deadline 

March 1, 2020                                Registration Deadline 

March 31 – April 2 2020               Conference Dates

March 30 – April 3 2020               PhD Symposium

 

ABOUT THE CONFERENCE

The 5th version of this conference aims to advance our understanding of entrepreneurship-as-practice, foster network ties, facilitate collaborative writing relationships, and build a strong community of practice scholars. To do so, we have developed a Research Conference and PhD Symposium that educates interested scholars as well as develops empirical and conceptual papers regarding the ‘practice turn’ taking place in entrepreneurship studies. 

Building on the first (February 2016 at VU Amsterdam), second (February 2017 at University College Dublin Quinn School of Business), third (April 2018 at Linnaeus University) and fourth (April 2019 at Nantes Business School) Entrepreneurship-as-Practice conferences, this conference and PhD symposium bring the growing community of researchers who embrace the “practice turn” back to Amsterdam.

INTRODUCTION

The practice tradition (also known as practice-based studies, the practice approach or the practice lens) in the social sciences forefronts the notion that practices and their connections are fundamental to the ontology of all social phenomena (Rouse, 2006; T. Schatzki, Knorr-Cetina, & Savigny, 2001). Ventures, firms or startups, in this view, are not ontologically separate phenomena from the performance of everyday, materially accomplished and ordered practices (Chalmers & Shaw, 2017; Hill, 2018; Johannisson, 2011; Vincent & Pagan, 2019). This is to say that no description or explanation of features of entrepreneurial life—such as, recognizing, evaluating and exploiting opportunities—is possible without the ‘alternate’ description and explanation of how entrepreneurial life is actually lived in and through practices (Gross, Carson, & Jones, 2014; Keating, Geiger, & Mcloughlin, 2013). The term ‘practice’, therefore, does not refer to an ‘empty’ conceptual category of ‘what entrepreneurs think and do’ (Sklaveniti & Steyaert, 2019), but encompasses the meaning-making, identity-forming and order-producing interactions (Chia & Holt, 2006; Nicolini, 2009) enacted by multiple entrepreneurial practitioners and situated in specific (historical) conditions. Therefore, practice theories orient entrepreneurship scholars to take seriously the practices of entrepreneuring as they unfold and are experienced in real-time rather than as they are remembered. Simply put, practice scholars are concerned with the ‘nitty-gritty’ work of entrepreneuring—all the meetings, the talking, the selling, the form-filling and the number-crunching by which opportunities actually get enacted (Matthews, Chalmers, & Fraser, 2018; Whittington, 1996). This comes with considerable ontological, theoretical and methodological implications which will be addressed during the Conference and PhD Symposium.  

For background and information on EaP literature, prior conferences, media and other pertinent materials, please go to: https://www.entrepreneurshipaspractice.com.

STRUCTURE OF THE CONFERENCE AND PhD SYMPOSIUM

The Conference will be held over three full days, March 31st– April 2nd. March 31st will be about Mapping the developing field of EaP that includes plenary sessions and an unconference event (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unconference), concluding with drinks. April 1st will be about Methodological approaches and publishing EaP research and include keynote session, parallel sessions on various methodologies, and plenary session. We will end the day with a boat ride, tour of entrepreneurial district and dinner. April 2nd will prominently feature the paper development workshop and a keynote lecture, with the conference ending around 16.30.

The PhD symposium includes 30th March (late afternoon and evening) up until 3rd April morning (until lunch). PhD candidates who want ECTS credits for their participation are required to attend. In these additional sessions, PhD students will be able to ask questions about EaP, meet and discuss ideas for research as well as generate additional work and discussion beyond what is required by other participants in the conference. Affordable hotels during entire duration are being held in Amsterdam for selected participants.

CALL FOR PAPERS

We welcome papers employing theories of practice to understand a wide array of entrepreneurship phenomena.  

Potential, although not exclusive, topics that may be addressed include:

Theoretical Challenges: What are the differences between the individualism, structuralism and practice traditions of entrepreneurship research? How is the process approach to entrepreneurship (entrepreneuring) similar to and different from practice approach?  How are entrepreneurial behaviour theories (discover, creation, effectuation, bricolage) similar and different than practice-based theories? How can we carve out insights and theories without the traditional aim of reification and generalization, given practice theories’ phenomenological roots? How can we theoretically cope with the enormous diversity of practices in which entrepreneurship is implicated? How can entrepreneurship studies help to theorize the reproduction and transformation of practical knowledge? How can we incorporate embodiment and sociomateriality into our understanding of practices related to entrepreneurship? How can an EaP perspective rejuvenate our thinking about traditional entrepreneurship related topics of innovating, creating opportunities, networking, venturing, strategizing, financing and organizing? What is the value of existing theoretical frameworks of practice for entrepreneurship research, and when should we employ or go beyond them? (How) are EaP contributions critical?

Methodological and Empirical Challenges: How does one begin an EaP study, such as selecting and entering a site for observation? As theories of practice guide us to study the real-time and unique instances of practices related to entrepreneurship, how can we observe, analyse and theorize about these unique instances, whilst still accounting for their relations to other practices?  What are some common research questions that can be formulated and answered using an EaP perspective, and which practice theory is appropriate for which research questions in entrepreneurship? How can one catalogue and rigorously analyse large amounts of video-based ethnographic data?  What can we methodologically learn from the history of the Strategy as Practice (SaP) community? 

ABSTRACT / PAPER SUBMISSION

All those are interested to attend the conference should submit an abstract (of approximately 1,000 words) by December 16, 2019 to eap5vu@gmail.com

Abstracts should not exceed two single-spaced pages, and may not exceed the maximum limit of 1,000 words. They should present the purpose of the research, the relevance of the problem, the literature review, the methods and the main findings. Authors will be notified of acceptance or otherwise by December 20, 2019. Full working papers are due for February 16, 2020

The manuscript should be 10-15 pages, Times New Roman 12, single spacing. Abstracts and papers should be written and presented in English.

All working papers will be assigned to discussion groups. Each group member will be responsible for providing feedback on the papers received during the working paper session on April 2nd.  

Conference Fees:

Fees for Research Conference participants: 525 euros

Fees for PhD Symposium (inclusive Research Conference) for selected participants: 275 euros

Registration:

After abstract acceptance, please go to www.entrepreneurshipaspractice.com

Questions:

eap5vu@gmail.com

 

References

Chalmers, D. M., & Shaw, E. (2017). The endogenous construction of entrepreneurial contexts: A practice-based perspective. International Small Business Journal: Researching Entrepreneurship, 35(1), 19–39. https://doi.org/10.1177/0266242615589768

Chia, R., & Holt, R. (2006). Strategy as Practical Coping: A Heideggerian Perspective. Organization Studies , 27(5), 635–655. https://doi.org/10.1177/0170840606064102

Gross, N., Carson, D., & Jones, R. (2014). Beyond rhetoric: re-thinking entrepreneurial marketing from a practice perspective. Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, 16(2), 105–127. https://doi.org/10.1108/JRME-01-2014-0003

Hill, I. (2018). How did you get up and running? Taking a Bourdieuan perspective towards a framework for negotiating strategic fit. Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, 1–35. https://doi.org/10.1080/08985626.2018.1449015

Johannisson, B. (2011). Towards a practice theory of entrepreneuring. Small Business Economics, 36(2), 135–150. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11187-009-9212-8

Keating, A., Geiger, S., & Mcloughlin, D. (2013). Riding the Practice Waves: Social Resourcing Practices During New Venture Development. Entrepreneurship: Theory and Practice, 38(5), 1–29. https://doi.org/10.1111/etap.12038

Matthews, R. S., Chalmers, D. M., & Fraser, S. S. (2018). The intersection of entrepreneurship and selling: An interdisciplinary review, framework, and future research agenda. Journal of Business Venturing, In Press. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusvent.2018.04.008

Nicolini, D. (2009). Zooming in and out: studying practices by switching theoretical lenses and trailing connections. Organization Studies, 30(12), 1391–1418.

Rouse, J. (2006). Practice theory. In D. M. Gabbay, P. Thagard, & J. Woods (Eds.), Handbook of the Philosophy of Science (Vol. 15, pp. 500–540). Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-044451542-1/50020-9

Schatzki, T., Knorr-Cetina, K., & Savigny, E. von. (2001). The practice turn in contemporary theory. (T. R. Schatzki, K. Knorr-Cetina, & E. von Savigny, Eds.). London: Routledge. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0956-5221(03)00029-0

Sklaveniti, C., & Steyaert, C. (2019). Reflecting with Pierre Bourdieu: Towards a reflexive outlook for practice-based studies of entrepreneurship. Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, (forthcoming), 1–21. https://doi.org/10.1080/08985626.2019.1641976

Vincent, S., & Pagan, V. (2019). Entrepreneurial agency and field relations: A Realist Bourdieusian Analysis. Human Relations, 72(2), 188–216. https://doi.org/10.1177/0018726718767952

Whittington, R. (1996). Strategy as practice. Long Range Planning, 29(5), 731–735. https://doi.org/10.1016/0024-6301(96)00068-4

Launch of CRSE: a new international think tank on self-employment and its impact on the economy

A new think tank devoted to research on self-employment and freelancing was launched on 26 November with a memorable celebration at the iconic National Gallery London. The Centre for Research on Self-Employment (CRSE) is a pioneering venture and will be the leading think tank working to improve the understanding of self-employment and its impact on the economy.

Through collaboration with a network of academics from around the world, the CRSE will deliver robust and multidisciplinary research into this now significant sector. The CRSE’s work will provide the basis for international comparisons and, ultimately, create a more informed and innovative library of knowledge on this topic. Another key function of the CRSE is to inform debate over regulatory issues which affect the self-employed. So far, at least three prominent members of DARE were invited to be involved in this think tank.

The Handbook of Research on Freelancing and Self-Employment
To coincide with the launch, the CRSE has published its first book, ‘The Handbook of Research on Freelancing and Self-Employment’. The Handbook includes contributions from leading international academics who, over thirteen chapters, explore a diverse set of topics surrounding freelancing and self-employment. For those who are interested in further reading, the book can be downloaded from the CRSE website at www.crse.co.uk

What’s to come…
The Handbook is the first step in developing an accessible single source for key research into this sector, and just the beginning of much more to come from the CRSE. In the coming months new publications into self-employment trends across Europe and the UK will be published in the CRSE Research Library. The library will also play host to a series of videos that showcase the research and expert perspectives of some of the leading minds in self-employment studies, which were filmed at the Global Workshop on Freelancing and Self-Employment held 26-27 November 2015 in London.

IPSE, the Association of Independent Professionals and the Self Employed, is proud to support and be a catalyst in the development of the CRSE which is chaired by Professor Andrew Burke, Dean of Trinity Business School at Trinity College Dublin.

Commenting on the launch, CRSE Chairman Prof. Andrew Burke, Dean of Trinity Business School, Dublin, said: “The self-employed and freelancers are transforming business practices and career choice. Businesses are making greater use of freelancers to manage risk and drive growth through the adoption of more agile, flexible and innovative activities. We have come a long way from the situation in the last Century when freelancing was regarded as the domain of vulnerable workers. This new think tank brings together the world’s leading researchers in the field and engages them with industry in order to create a deeper knowledge of modern freelancing to better inform managers, entrepreneurs, public policy and those undertaking a freelance career.”

IPSE Chairman James Collings said: “In supporting the creation of the Centre for Research on Self-Employment, IPSE is striving to deepen our understanding of the people we represent. It is widely recognised that the self-employed have an important impact on modern economies, but they are a sector of the labour market that is often misunderstood and misrepresented. The CRSE will also play a key role in strengthening our ability to make evidence-based policy proposals to Government.“

Call for participation in international research project: inspiration and self-awareness in entrepreneurship education

The hypothesis that participation in an entrepreneurship course actually leads to higher ánd lower scores on entrepreneurial intentions via self-awareness (and that this is a positive thing), is a new approach. The study is also innovative in its focus on inspiration and its use of a multi-item construct from the area of psychology to measure this. Furthermore, it is the first to explore which specific course aspects (content or form) are related to inspiration and self-awareness. Finally, it is the first international comparison of the specific content of entrepreneurship courses with a pre-post design to be executed on this scale. In this sense it is different than, for example, the GUESSS project, which is a one-time measurement of entrepreneurial intentions and contextual factors among a broad population of students.

Joining this research project will result in knowledge development (you will be the first to have access to the results), more visibility and extended international networking, and possibly very specific ideas for curriculum innovation. So far, six institutions (from Canada, Finland, Norway and the United Arab Emirates) have already expressed their interest and sixteen more institutions from countries all over the world have very recently been approached.

Can you provide us with students to participate in our international research project on the impact of entrepreneurship education on students’ entrepreneurial intentions via self-awareness and inspiration?

We are looking for students who follow a course specifically dedicated to entrepreneurship (elective or obligatory, not necessarily part of a program in entrepreneurship). We also need an equally sized control group of students with a similar profile that do not follow this course. The course should last between 6 weeks and 6 months (minimum: 3 US credits or 5 ECTS). The measurements (1 in the first week of classes, 1 before the final grades are published) can be anywhere between November 1, 2015, and July 1, 2016.

Please let us know if you are interested,

 

Kind regards,

Dr. Anne van Ewijk (Abu Dhabi University, UAE) & Dr. Wiebke Weber (Pompeu Fabra University, Spain)

anne.ewijk@adu.ac.ae

+971.3.709.0755

abu-dhabi